National Institute on Drug Abuse Updates Website, Now has “Marijuana as Medicine” Page

Advertisements

Bills that would legalize medical cannabis have been filed in West Virginia’s House of Delegates and Senate.

March 06, 2017

Delegate Mike Pushkin (D) filed House Bill 2677, and Senator Richard Ojeda (D) filed Senate Bill 386. Both would legalize medical cannabis, albeit in different manners. HB 2688 has no cosponsors, whereas SB 386 is cosponsored by a bipartisan coalition of nine senators.

HB 2677 would legalize the possession of up to six ounces of cannabis, and the cultivation of up to 12 plants, for those with a qualifying condition who receive a recommendation from a physician. Qualifying conditions include:

(A) Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, agitation of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, addiction to opiates or amphetamines or the treatment of these conditions;

(B) A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment that produces one or more of the following: Cachexia or wasting syndrome; severe or chronic pain; severe nausea; seizures; or severe and persistent muscle spasms, including, but not limited to, those characteristic of multiple sclerosis; or

(C) Any other medical condition or its treatment added by the department, as provided in section six of this article.

The proposal would established a system of licensed and regulated cannabis dispensaries, as a means of safe access to the medicine.

SB 386 would also legalize medical cannabis – including license dispensaries – but in a more limited way. Qualifying conditions include:

(A) A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that results in a patient being admitted into hospice or receiving palliative care; or

(B) A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or the treatment of a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that produces:

(i) Cachexia, anorexia, or wasting syndrome;

(ii) Severe or chronic pain that does not find effective relief through standard pain medication;

(iii) Severe nausea;

(iv) Seizures; or

(v) Severe or persistent muscle spasms.

 

HB 2677 has been assigned to the House Prevention and Treatment of Substance Abuse Committee. SB 386 has been assigned to the Senate Health and Human Resources.

New Hampshire’s House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee has passed a bill to decriminalize cannabis and hash possession.

New Hampshire’s House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee has passed a bill to decriminalize cannabis and hash possession.

House Bill 640 was approved with an overwhelming 14 to 2 vote. The measure would decriminalize the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis, and up to five grams of hash, for those 21 and older.

If police do catch someone possessing cannabis or hash within those limits, it would be “a fine of $100 for a first offense under this paragraph, a fine of $200 for a second offense within three years of the first offense, or a fine of $350 for a third or subsequent offense within 3 years of 2 other offenses.” Under current law the possession of even a minuscule amount of cannabis is a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail.

House Bill 640 is sponsored by a bipartisan, bicameral coalition of a dozen lawmakers including Representatives Robert Cushing (D), Keith Murphy (R), Frank Sapareto (R), William Pearson (D), Carol McGuire (R), Chuck Grassie (D), Daniel Eaton (D), Patricia Lovejoy (D), as well as Senators Martha Clark, John Reagan, Daniel Innis.

Last year New Hampshire’s full House of Representatives passed a similar bill with a 289 to 58 vote, but it failed to pass the Senate.

According to a WMUR Granite State Poll released July of last year, 61% of New Hampshire voters support legalizing cannabis.

The full text of House Bill 640 can be found by clicking here.

Source:  New Hampshire Committee Passes Bill to Decriminalize Cannabis and Hash appeared first on TheJointBlog.com.

The Endocannabinoid System For Dummies (We’ve Made It Easy For You)

endocannaninoid hero The Endocannabinoid System For Dummies (Weve Made It Easy For You)Photo credit

Have you ever wondered how THC works? Well, it just-so-happens to be a similar shape to a compound our bodies create naturally. Thanks to its shape, THC is able to tap into a network in our bodies called the endocannabinoid system. It’s this ability that gives THC it’s psychoactive effects. But, what is the endocannabinoid system and what does it do? To help you understand, we’ve created a handy guide to the endocannabinoid system for dummies. 

What is the endocannabinoid system (ECS)?

Endocannabinoid System1 1 The Endocannabinoid System For Dummies (Weve Made It Easy For You)
Photo credit

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) refers to a collection of cell receptors and corresponding molecules. You can think of cell receptors like little locks on the surface of your cells. The keys to these locks are chemical molecules called agonists. Each time an agonist binds to a cell it relays a message, giving your cell specific direction.

The endocannabinoid system is the name for a series of cell receptors that respond to certain kinds of agonists. Two primary cell receptors make up the ECS, Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) and Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2). The keys for these receptors are called endocannabinoids. Endocannabinoids are like the body’s natural

Endocannabinoids are like the body’s natural THC. In fact, endocannabinoids got their name from cannabis. Plant cannabinoids were discovered first. Endo means within, and cannabinoid referring to a compound that fits into cannabinoid receptors.

There are two main endocannabinoid molecules, named anandamide and 2-Ag. Funny thing, scientists wouldn’t have discovered anandamide without THC. Psychoactive (THC) was first discovered by Israeli scientist Raphael Mechoulam back in the 1960s. His finding quickly spurred a rush to figure out how THC worked, and whether or not our own bodies produced a similar compound.

More than two decades after the search began, anandamide was found. Yet, once they isolated the chemical, they faced another challenge. What should it be called? They turned to Sanskrit. Anandamide comes from the Sanskrit word Ananda, which means bliss. So, basically, anandamide means bliss molecule.

What does the ECS do?

Cannabinoid receptors are found all throughout the body, giving them a wide variety of functions. However, certain receptors are more concentrated in specific regions. CB1 receptors are abundant in the central nervous system. CB2 receptors are more often found on immune cells, in the gastrointestinal tract, and in the peripheral nervous system.

The diversity of receptor locations shows just how important endocannabinoids are for day-to-day bodily function. They help regulate the following:

Endocannabinoids are the chemical messengers that tell your body to get these processes moving and when to stop. They help maintain optimal balance in the body, also known as homeostasis. When the ECS is disrupted, any one of these things can fall out of balance. Dysregulation in the ECS is thought to contribute to a wide variety of conditions, including fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome.

The ECS theory of disease is termed “Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency“.  The idea is simple: when the body does not produce enough endocannabinoids or cannot regulate them properly, you are more susceptible to illnesses that affect one or several of the functions listed above.

Where do endocannabinoids come from?

Endocannabinoid System2 1 The Endocannabinoid System For Dummies (Weve Made It Easy For You)
Photo credit

If your body cannot produce enough endocannabinoids, you might be in for some trouble. But, where do endocannabinoids come from, anyway? This question has another simple answer: diet.

Your body creates endocannabinoids with the help of fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are especially important for this. Recent research in animal models has found a connection between diets low in omega-3s and mood changes caused by poor endocannabinoid regulation.

Fortunately, hemp seeds are a quality source of omgea-3s. However, fish like salmon and sardines produce a form of omega-3s that is easier for your body to put to use.

Beyond cell receptors

Endocannabinoid System3 1 The Endocannabinoid System For Dummies (Weve Made It Easy For You)
Photo credit

Cannabinoid receptors are often what we associate with the endocannabinoid system. But, the ECS is more complicated than that. Enzymes also have a crucial role to play in the process. In a way, enzymes are kind of like Pacman. They gobble up various compounds, change them, and then spit out the parts. In the ECS, enzymes break down leftover endocannabinoids. Enter non-psychoactive CBD.

Enter non-psychoactive CBD. While THC binds with cannabinoid receptors directly, CBD does not. Instead, it works it’s magic on an enzyme. The enzyme in question is called FAAH, and it is responsible for pulling excess anandamide out of circulation.

CBD puts a stop to this. Psychoactive THC works by mimicking the body’s own endocannabinoids. But, CBD increases the amount of endocannabinoids in your system.

CBD stops enzyme FAAH from breaking down all of the anandamide, and therefore makes more of it available for use by your cells. This is why CBD is a natural mood-lifter without psychoactive effects.

This is just a brief overview of the endocannabinoid system. Each year, new studies shed light into what this amazing network does inside our bodies. The discovery of the ECS is what makes medical cannabis such a big deal.

People often joke about the herb’s ability to heal a wide variety of seemingly unrelated conditions. But, we now understand that these conditions are all regulated in part by the ECS. The medical implications of this finding are endless.

Source:  Endocannabinoid System for Dummies

Are You Ready for Some Football? Recipes and Strain Suggestions for the Big Game

Well folks, the “we have to call it the ‘Big Game’ because that other name is trademarked but we all know what the ‘Big Game’ actually refers to” is taking place this Sunday in sunny Houston, Texas. For those of you who are football fans, absurdly expensive commercial fans, or just fans of hanging out with your friends so you can chow down on food and vape your favorite strain while they shake their fists and scream obscenities at the television, here’s a list of some cannabis-infused recipes and strains to make Sunday even more “Super.”

Cannabis-Infused Recipes for the Big Football Game

1. Cannabis-Infused Chipotle Avocado Baked Macaroni and Cheese

cannabis infused chipotle avocado baked macaroni and cheese

Who doesn’t love mac and cheese? This homey dish of cannabis-infused cheesy, creamy deliciousness will warm the bellies of your friends as they watch the Patriots and Falcons face off.

2. Cannabis-Infused Cucumber Avocado Dip

cannabis infused cucumber avocado dip

Dips are their own genre of food when it comes to watching sports. This recipe for infused cucumber avocado dip is deceptively healthy but definitely delicious.

3. Cannabis-Infused Guacamole

ingredients for guacamole

Speaking of dips, guacamole is a must-have at any championship viewing party. But what’s better than guacamole? Cannabis-infused guacamole, of course!

4. Cannabis-Infused Hummus

Cannabis-Infused Hummus

Three infused dip recipes? Why the heck not? Pair this infused hummus with some pita chips or crudité, or smear it onto chicken feta sliders.

5. Cannabis-Infused Pesto Pizza

pesto pizza

Whip up a few pizzas with different topping combinations for instant viewing party MVP status.

6. Cannabis-Infused Coleslaw

Cannabis Infused Cole Slaw

If you’re going the BBQ route, this side dish of cannabis-infused coleslaw makes a pairing as perfect as Brady and Belichick.

7. Cannabis-Infused Bacon

bacon-1280x800

Honestly, it doesn’t matter what you do with this – it’s cannabis-infused bacon, for crying out loud. Wrap it around dates and roast them so they look like little footballs (laces out!). Make some bacon cheeseburgers. Or just put out a tray of cannabis-infused bacon – after all, bacon is pretty damn delicious.

Note: Dosing homemade edibles can be tricky (click here to learn why), so the best way to test for potency is to start with one portion of a serving, wait one to two hours, then make an informed decision on whether to consume more. Always dose carefully and listen to your body, and never drive under the influence of cannabis.

Cannabis Strains to Pick Up for the Big Game

1. Peaches and Cream

Peaches and Cream Leafly Strain Tile

With this guaranteed good-mood hybrid strain, notes reminiscent of sweet Georgia peaches come through in a flavor profile that Atlanta fans will absolutely appreciate.

2. American Kush

American Kush Leafly Strain Tile

For Patriots fans, this star-spangled indica delivers happy, tingly effects to match how you’ll feel if Brady and Belichick do it again.

3. Southern Lights

Southern Lights Leafly Strain Tile

For all you Falcons fans, this smoothly smokable sativa relaxes your body and sharpens your mind, letting you take it all in from the comfort of any given couch.

4. Kaboom

Kaboom Leafly Strain Tile

Whenever anyone takes a big hit, take an equally big hit of this lemony sativa.

5. Super Silver Haze

Super Silver Haze Leafly Strain Tile

Silver is a tertiary color for both teams headed to Houston, and come Sunday those silver accents are going to be looking pretty super. Even better, this popular sativa will deliver the energy needed to pump you up for the opening kickoff.

6. Champagne Kush

Champagne Kush Leafly Strain Tile

Treachoself! When the fourth quarter clock reaches zero and the Gatorade is dumped on the winning coach, bust out this uplifting flowery hybrid and celebrate in style.

Source:  Leafly