Philmont “77” A Poem by Charles “Danny” Hutson

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Philmont “77” A Poem by Charles “Danny” Hutson

This poem was written by my father in 1977 which was the year me and him had the adventure of a lifetime for a father and son.

My older brother and I were both in the local Boy Scout troop and our father was the Scoutmaster for many years. It was a wonderful arrangement between a father and his sons.

It got even better when I decided to follow in my older brothers footsteps and go to the “high adventure camp” known as Philmont that the Boy Scouts had created in northeastern New Mexico.

During the last training week I attended in northern Virginia one of the leaders had to drop out of the trip and my father was asked if he would be interested.

Of course he said yes and the rest is history.

This poem tells a story. It is a story about a man and a small group of teenagers including his son (me) and an epic journey, both for the man, and also the boys who would be tested as men.

Some of the content will make little sense to anyone who has never experienced Philmont but I think you will enjoy it all the same.

Philmont “77”

We left on a long, long journey,

From Virginia to New Mexico.

It took us five days to get there,

Which seemed the long way to go.

 

We went up in the Arch,

Had a day at Six Flags.

The rides were all great,

There wasn’t any drags.

 

We got off that ole’ bus,

And loaded our packs.

After a night in Tent City,

We soon made fast tracks.

 

We learned about burros,

Although you can’t ride.

They’ll carry lots for you,

If you stay on their “good side”.

 

We climbed the tree,

With spikes and belt.

And when we were down,

How great it felt. FALLING!!!

 

We climbed the rocks,

And then rappelled down.

We knew it was no place,

To be clowning around. FALLING AGAIN!!!

 

We stopped at “Cito”,

And picked up food.

Although the clerk thought so,

We weren’t being rude.

 

We explored the Mine,

And heard “Charlie’s Tale”.

The gold we panned,

Didn’t budge the scale.

 

We finally got to see a bear,

And take his picture too.

He didn’t get our Bear Bag,

But he enjoyed the other crew’s.

 

We made it up Ole’ Baldy,

The climb she wasn’t easy.

And when we reached the top,

It was really breezy.

 

The Munchies, the Vita’s,

The Tetrox, the cheese.

All kept us too busy,

To climb any trees. (Trots or Not)

 

The horse riding was great,

The saddling was fun.

But why did some guys,

Make them all run?

 

We hiked down the North Fork Urraca,

The Comanche also.

Just where we were going,

We didn’t know.

 

We climbed The Tooth (of Time)

And enjoyed the veiw,

We only missed sunrise,

By an hour or two.

 

The packs were heavy,

The days were long.

The nights were short,

After our favorite song.

 

The map it was right,

And the trail signs too.

It must have been our compasses,

That gave us the screws !

 

We took some side hikes,

We bushwhacked a little.

But considering the Itinerary,

We solved the riddle.

 

The Mountain Search and Rescue,

Was really very trying.

But our First Aid training,

Helped us keep the guy from dying. (Pete Bradfield)

 

We’re on our way home now,

It’ll be a while yet.

But I’m sure the SCARF CREW,

Doesn’t have any regret.

 

So here’s to Philmont boys,

May we always remember.

When we’re sitting around our camp fires,

Watching the dying embers.

 

We’d go again,

Of that I’m very sure.

Because it’s a Scouter’s dream,

An experience so rich and pure.

 

By: Charles “Dan The MAN” Hutson

Expedition # 725 A-2

Itinerary # 19-B

August 11th, 1977

This poem is dedicated to a GREAT crew.

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Old Age Is Hell

The body gets stiff

You get cramps in your legs

Corns on your feet

As big as hen eggs

 

Gas on your stomach

Elimination is poor

Take Ex Lax at night

And then your not sure

 

You soak in the tub

Or your body will smell

It’s like I said folks

Old age is Hell

 

Your teeth start decaying

Your eyesight is poor

Hair falling out

All over the floor

 

Sex life is short

It’s a thing of the past

Don’t kid yourself friend

Even that doesn’t last

 

Can’t go to parties

Don’t dance anymore

Just to put things mildly

You’re a helluva bore

 

Liquor is out

Can’t take a chance

Your bladder is weak

Might pee in your pants

 

Nothing to plan for

Nothing to expect

Just the mailman comes

With your Security check

 

Now be sure your affairs are in order

And your will is made out right

Or on the way to the graveyard

There will be a helluva fight

 

You look pretty good

You look fairly well

Thank God your alive

Old age is HELL !

Catch 22 Is Alive And Well

Paths I Walk

By Paula & Oro Cas

Catch-22:  A dilemma or difficult circumstance from which there is no escape because of mutually conflicting or dependent conditions.

I sit looking at this document wondering how to write about the craptastic Catch-22 that has appeared in my husband’s life. My husband is one of the millions of people who suffer with chronic pain. His journey to where he is today began 35 years ago when he worked for a traveling carnival. While working to repair a ride, the clutch holding the ride’s car opposite the repairmen failed sending the cars around the track. Hubby and two other workers fell 50 feet resulting in multiple fractures and life threatening injuries. Combine those injuries with 30 years of commercial truck driving, a near fatal lightning strike resulting in damage to his nerve sheaths and joints, along with degenerative disk disease, stenosis, scoliosis, and osteoarthritis ……

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Antibiotics Are Killing You

What you DON”T know about antibiotics is killing you.

How many people do you know who have never taken an antibiotic in their lifetime ? Probably not very many. The fact is a large majority of people in this country and around the world have been prescribed an antibiotic at one point or another.

Would you have been willing to take that pill or injection if someone told you beforehand that there was a good chance your entire body make up would be changed ?

The lady who wrote the story I’m sharing is an incredible person with an inner strength that can only be understood by myself and others who are living with the physical effects  of this problem.

If your body seems to be breaking down quicker than normal then you will want to check Amy’s post out because she has shared a wealth of information on the subject.

This is the link to Amy’s story.  >>> This antibiotic will ruin you. 

Liebster Award Nomination

 

More-Flowers

I know a woman. Her name is Paula. I have known her since I was in the 7th grade. When I first met her she was friends with my older brother. They would hang out together working on school projects and she even made a few appearances to our house for supper and a visit.  Even though I was younger than her by five years, she still lit my fire.

Skip ahead to the 80’s and you will find that Paula and I had a chance meeting. It was completely unexpected for both of us and, even though it was brief, it would lead to our first date a few months later.

That first date took place in the month of September of 1985 and we would end up seeing each other every night after that until January, 10th of 1986. The next day, which happened to be January 11th, I watched as she walked down the aisle with her father. When they reached the front of the church he handed her over to me and we became a happily married couple.

Today it has been just over a month since we celebrated thirty two years together. As with any marriage that stands the test of time we have had our good times, bad times, and even times when we questioned why we were still together, but through it all we have remained a happily married couple as we promised each other on a cold day in 1986.

The reason I have taken the time to explain the success of our marriage is because she is the one to nominate me for this fantastic award along with the opportunity to spread my success on to other writers. It is an honor for me and I love my wife for including me.

First an explanation of the award.

The Liebster Award recognizes and celebrates bloggers, their content, skill, and contribution to the blogging community. The rules for accepting a nomination are:

Acknowledge the blogger who nominated your blog.

Answer the questions.

Nominate 11 bloggers to encourage them.

Ask them 11 questions.

Let them know you have nominated them.

Continue reading “Liebster Award Nomination”

This Old Clock

In the mid sixties during the early years of the Vietnam War my grandmothers youngest son, my Uncle Curtis, was stationed in Germany with the US Army. While there he visited the Black Forest area and during his visit he decided to buy three clocks for my grandmother.

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One was a cuckoo clock and the other two were known as “Parlor” clocks. One of them was a large rectangle box shaped beauty with a large face attached to hand made clock works inside a dark wooden cabinet with old fashioned glass all the way around in the shape of cut out windows. It made a magical sound when it chimed on the half and full hour.

The third clock (in the picture) was the fanciest and biggest clock of the three. It hung in the front room of the house I grew up in and was always one of the first things noticed by first time visitors. When it chimed you could hear it no matter where in the house you were. It was a deep sounding ring followed by a higher pitched ring that vibrated in your head if you happened to be in the same room.

One of my favorite stories about this clock happened one year during the Christmas season.

If memory serves me right I had just turned twelve a month before one particular Christmas eve when my older brother, younger sister, and I cooked up a plan to beat our parents long standing rule about Christmas morning.

To understand the rule I must first give you a mental picture of a typical December at our house in the early seventies.

My parents always made sure Christmas was pretty special when we were growing up. There was always a pile of presents for each of us, most of which we had asked for but every year there was always at least one surprise gift for each of us and my mother went to extremes to keep secret.

They would start the yearly gift buying just after Thanksgiving and it became a game for us about where presents were hidden and who’s name was on them. Most of their secrets stayed that way but it was always fun to search.

Another really cool thing about my time growing up was moving in with my grandparents, which happened soon after my Uncle Curtis was killed in Vietnam. He was given orders to go there from Germany where he had just sent my grandmother’s clocks from.

What made this really bad time in our lives a little better was the fact we came together as a family, and as a result my brother, sister, and I ended up with two sets of parents. It also meant that Mom would come up with “The Rule” about the same time.

The rule was simple. We could get up and come downstairs to the front room but no one was allowed to enter the living room until our grandparents had joined us in the front room. This was a big deal for my mother because of the time she spent transforming the living room into a magical place for Christmas morning and she always wanted everyone in the family to experience it together on that special morning.

That was also about the time my siblings and I realized that if we got up a little bit early we could make “Christmas morning” happen sooner. Like two hours early the first time we tried it.

The three of us decided to wake up and meet in the hall at 4 am. My younger sister was sent in to wake up the grandparents who had their room on the second floor with us.         Once the grandparents were on their way down the stairs we would be in the front room and the noise would wake our parents on cue.

The plan worked great the first time we tried it, but the second time was when I was 12. Due to the previous years plan, which was figured out pretty quick, the new rule from our mother was “time based”, meaning we had to wait until 6 am to be in the front room with grandparents in tow.

No biggie … We just revised our plan to include setting every single clock in the house back by three hours, meaning Christmas morning that year was to take place at 3 am.

After meeting in the hall at the set time, which was 2:30 am, my brother and I proceeded to change all the clocks. Since he was the oldest and also the tallest he got the job of changing all three German clocks while I was sent on my part of the mission which was to crawl into our parents’ bedroom and change their alarm clock to match the rest in the house.

Once everything was set we sent my sister upstairs to wake up the grandparents and you know the rest of the story. Well almost the rest.

We all had a fantastic Christmas morning right up to the point where my grandfather suggested making everyone breakfast, and my mother looked outside to see pitch blackness. You would think we had it coming but once again since it was Christmas morning, my mother laughed it off with the same promise it wouldn’t happen again.

Open Letter From A Chronic Pain Sufferer

By Stephanie Burke

This article is copied in its entirety with links to the original site I discovered this post on. I didn’t write this but it is amazing to me how much it mirrors what I have been wanting to say for a long time.

Having chronic pain means many things change, and a lot of the changes are invisible.

Unlike having cancer or being hurt in an accident, most people do not understand chronic pain and its effects, and of those that think they know, many are actually misinformed.

In the spirit of informing those who wish to understand: These are the things that I would like you to understand about me before you judge me.

  • Please understand that being sick doesn’t mean I’m not still a human being. I have to spend most of my day in considerable pain and exhaustion, and if you visit, sometimes I probably don’t seem like much fun to be with, but I’m still me, stuck inside this body. I still worry about work, my family, my friends, and most of the time, I’d still like to hear you talk about yours, too.

See Modern Theories of Chronic Pain

  • Please understand the difference between “happy” and “healthy”. When you’ve got the flu you probably feel miserable with it, but I’ve been sick for years. I can’t be miserable all the time. In fact, I work hard at not being miserable. So, if you’re talking to me and I sound happy, it means I’m happy. That’s all. It doesn’t mean that I’m not in a lot of pain, or not extremely tired, or that I’m getting better, or any of those things. Please don’t say, “Oh, you’re sounding better!” or “But you look so healthy!” I am merely coping. I am sounding happy and trying to look normal. If you want to comment on that, you’re welcome to.

See 4 Tips to Help Cope With Chronic Pain and Depression

  • Please understand that being able to stand up for 10 minutes doesn’t necessarily mean that I can stand up for 20 minutes, or an hour. Just because I managed to stand up for 30 minutes yesterday doesn’t mean that I can do the same today. With a lot of diseases you’re either paralyzed, or you can’t move. With this one, it gets more confusing every day. It can be like a yo-yo. I never know from day to day how I am going to feel when I wake up. In most cases, I never know from minute to minute. That is one of the hardest and most frustrating components of chronic pain.
  • Please repeat the above paragraph substituting “sitting,” “walking,” “thinking,” “concentrating,” “being sociable,” and so on; it applies to everything. That’s what chronic pain does to you.
  • Please understand that chronic pain is variable. It’s quite possible (and for many, it’s common) that one day I am able to walk to the park and back, while the next day I’ll have trouble getting to the next room. Please don’t attack me when I’m ill by saying, “But you did it before!” or “Oh, come on, I know you can do this!” If you want me to do something, then ask if I can. In a similar vein, I may need to cancel a previous commitment at the last minute. If this happens, please do not take it personally. If you are able to, please try to always remember how very lucky you are, to be physically able to do all of the things that you can do.

See Chronic Pain Coping Techniques – Pain Management

  • Please understand that “getting out and doing things” does not make me feel better, and can often make me seriously worse.You don’t know what I go through or how I suffer in my own private time. Telling me that I need to exercise or do some things to “get my mind off of it” may frustrate me to tears, and is not correct. If I was capable of doing some things any or all of the time, don’t you know that I would? I am working with my doctors and I am doing what I am supposed to do. Another statement that hurts is, “You just need to push yourself more, try harder.” Obviously, chronic pain can affect the whole body, or be localized to specific areas. Sometimes participating in a single activity for a short or a long period of time can cause more damage and physical pain than you could ever imagine. Not to mention the recovery time, which can be intense. You can’t always read it on my face or in my body language. Also, chronic pain may cause secondary depression (wouldn’t you get depressed and down if you were hurting constantly for months or years?), but it is not created by depression.

See Depression and Chronic Back Pain

  • Please understand that if I say I have to sit down, lie down, stay in bed, or take these pills now, that probably means that I do have to do it right now, it can’t be put off or forgotten just because I’m somewhere, or I’m right in the middle of doing something. Chronic pain does not forgive, nor does it wait for anyone.
  • If you want to suggest a cure to me, please don’t. It’s not because I don’t appreciate the thought, and it’s not because I don’t want to get well. Lord knows that isn’t true. In all likelihood, if you’ve heard of it or tried it, so have I. In some cases, I have been made sicker, not better. This can involve side effects or allergic reactions, as is the case with herbal remedies. It also includes failure, which in and of itself can make me feel even lower. If there were something that cured, or even helped people with my form of chronic pain, then we’d know about it. There is worldwide networking (both on and off the Internet) between people with chronic pain. If something worked, we would KNOW. It’s definitely not for lack of trying. If, after reading this, you still feel the need to suggest a cure, then so be it. I may take what you said and discuss it with my doctor.

See Pain Management for Chronic Back Pain

  • If I seem touchy, it’s probably because I am. It’s not how I try to be. As a matter of fact, I try very hard to be normal. I hope you will try to understand. I have been, and am still, going through a lot. Chronic pain is hard for you to understand unless you have had it. It wreaks havoc on the body and the mind. It is exhausting and exasperating. Almost all the time, I know that I am doing my best to cope with this, and live my life to the best of my ability. I ask you to bear with me, and accept me as I am. I know that you cannot literally understand my situation unless you have been in my shoes, but as much as is possible, I am asking you to try to be understanding in general.

See 11 Chronic Pain Control Techniques

  • In many ways I depend on you, people who are not sick. I need you to visit me when I am too sick to go out. Sometimes I need you help me with the shopping, the cooking, or the cleaning. I may need you to take me to the doctor or to the store. You are my link to the “normalcy” of life. You can help me to keep in touch with the parts of life that I miss and fully intend to undertake again, just as soon as I am able.
  • I know that I asked a lot from you, and I do thank you for listening. It really does mean a lot.

From <https://www.spine-health.com/blog/open-letter-a-person-chronic-pain>

Three Characteristics Of A Genius – Do You Possess Them ?

Geniuses throughout the ages have been found to possess three special characteristics.

Characteristic #1: They Have Developed Their Ability to Concentrate

First, all geniuses seem to have developed the ability to concentrate single mindedly on one question, problem or goal at a time, and to exclude all other diversions or distractions. 

The more intensely you concentrate your thoughts and attention, and the more intensely you are emotionally involved with a problem or goal, the more likely it is that your mind will respond with the kind of creative ideas that you need.  And the good news is that concentration comes from practicing the process of concentrating whenever you have something you want to accomplish.

One of the best ways to develop this habit of concentration is to define your goal or problem clearly, in writing, at the top of a piece of paper.  Then, write down every single detail that you can think of that pertains to that goal or problem.  Write every fact, figure and piece of information that you have.  The more you write, the more likely it is that you will come up with exactly the idea that you need to solve the problem or difficulty that is currently holding you back.

Characteristic #2: They Have Incredible Problem Solving Skills

rubiks cube

The second quality of geniuses is that they have incredible problem solving skills and developed a systematic approach to solving problems.  Usually, they write them down clearly on paper in advance.  Accurate problem definition leads to a solution in fully 50% of cases.  Most of the time, when you have a problem or series of problems that is causing you worry or concern, it is because you have not yet sat down and clearly defined exactly what the problem is.

Most people who are unhappy in life have no goals.  The very act of sitting down and writing out a list of goals will change your perspective completely.  When you take your list of goals, organize it by priority and then make written plans to achieve your most important goals, your mind will start to sparkle with ideas that will help you.  Your negativity and pessimism will vanish.  You will experience a surge of energy and enthusiasm and you will want to get up and get going immediately on whatever it is you have written down.

One of the key parts of approaching your problems or goals systematically is the importance of validating the information that you have.  As the humorist Josh Billings once wrote, “It isn’t what a man knows that hurts him.  He what he knows that isn’t true.”

There are an enormous number of things that you think you “know” about your life and situation that are simply not true.  One of the best ways to manage your creativity is to carefully check and double check your facts and figures to be sure that they are accurate.

Characteristic #3: They Have Open Minds

The third characteristic of genius is that they invariably have open minds.  They are curious, friendly, even playful.  They refuse to jump to conclusions or to cut off any line of thinking or train of thought.  They continually ask questions, especially, “What if?”

“What if?” questioning is one of the hallmarks of developing and managing your creativity.  For example, what if everything that you are doing in your current job or situation to achieve your goal or to solve your major problem was completely wrong?  What if there was a better way?  What if you were operating on the basis of false information or wrong assumptions?  What if what you were attempting to do was actually impossible and that is why you are having such problems with it.

I have known many people who have been in bad jobs.  They were constantly coming up with ideas to make their jobs more acceptable.  Finally, they realized that the boss was always going to be negative, the company was always going to be bureaucratic and the marketplace was always going to be ruthless.  So instead of trying to find a solution to their current job, they changed jobs and turned out later to be very happy and much better paid.  Could this apply to you?

*What did you learn? Leave me a comment!

 

From <https://www.briantracy.com/blog/personal-success/three-characteristics-of-a-genius-do-you-possess-them/>

Higher Self

secretsoftheserpent

Most of you know I am not a fan of religion.  That is putting it mildly.   I’m going to be straight, this world would be a lot better place if religion were gone. How can I say that? Religion keeps you from knowing your Higher Self. Religion works because in your memory you have a feeling of wholeness. The fall of the gods and goddesses in all the myths is us. We have fallen from wholeness into this meaty body. Religion was created so we can’t figure out how powerful we actually are. With religion we think we are taken care of and someone else is in charge of our lives. Let me ask you something. When we raise our kids, do we try to get them to think for themselves? Do we want them to run to us every time they have a problem, like when they were…

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Independence Day… a Few Facts

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.

What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they signed the of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walalton, Guinett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson Jr, noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt. Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died from exhaustion and a broken heart. Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.

Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution. These were not wild-eyed, rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means and  education. They had security, but they valued liberty more. Standing tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged:

“For the support of this declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.”

They gave you and me a free and independent America.

The history books never told you a lot about what happened in the Revolutionary War. We didn’t fight just the British.

We were British subjects at that time and we fought our own government! Some of us take these liberties so much for granted, but we shouldn’t. So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots. It’s not much to ask for the price they paid. Remember freedom is never free!

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